How to Wash Blackbough Swimwear

Blackbough Swim is a swimwear brand that’s based in Manila, Philippines. They sell more than just bathing suits, though. They also offer skirts, shorts, tees, and sarongs. On top of that, they have an accessories section that includes hats, scrunchies, and face masks.

More About Blackbough Swim

Blackbough Swim was founded by Jemina Ty in 2017. In search of the perfect bikini, she began to make her own, which she eventually sold in small batches. Since then, her swimsuits have been worn by tens of thousands of individuals worldwide.

You can find them on their official website. As far as we can tell, their products are not available from other retailers.

What Kind of Swimwear Do They Sell?

They offer a full range of one- and two-piece bathing suits that you can mix and match. Aside from solid colors, they also have a variety of patterns from leopard print to floral designs. There are also three types of coverage that you can choose from—modest, tease, or cheeky.

Price-wise, you’re looking at about $50 for a bikini top or bottom ($100 for a full set). They do have a sale section, though, for those who are looking for deals. Express shipping is also free if you spend over $100. And if you sign up for their newsletter, you can get 10% off your first order!

Taking Care of Blackbough Swimwear

Swimsuits are delicate; the fibers can easily stretch over time. Given that, it’s crucial that you take proper care of them. This means rinsing them after each wear—that way, there won’t be any degradation from chemicals.

You also want to be gentle when you’re washing them. Remember, they can easily be ruined with one wrong step!

Materials Used by Blackbough Swimwear

Their bikinis are made of various synthetic fibers. Let’s have a closer look at them below.

Nylon

Nylon is strong, lightweight, and stretchy. It also has low water absorbency (ie. it won’t absorb water even if you’re in it). If anything, that’s what makes it so great for swimsuits. Keep in mind, however, that it is sensitive to heat. Also, the colors can fade if you leave it out in the sun.

Spandex

Spandex is known for its elasticity (it can stretch many times its normal size). For this reason, it’s often incorporated in form-fitting garments such as leggings and swimsuits. And while it’s a strong fiber, it’s rarely used by itself. Rather, it’s blended with other textiles such as polyester, cotton, or nylon (this gives it the properties of both fabrics).

Polyester

Polyester is resistant to wrinkles, abrasion, and moisture. It’s also lightweight, which is one of the reasons why it’s used for activewear such as jackets and leggings. Plus, it has moisture-wicking abilities (ie. it can pull sweat from the skin). The only thing is that it’s not very breathable, which is to be expected from a synthetic textile.

How to Wash Blackbough Swimwear

Blackbough recommends that you wash their bikinis by hand and while that’s true, you can also put them in the washing machine—there are just a few precautions that you have to take, which we’ll be going over later.

Handwashing Your Blackbough Bikinis and Swimsuits 

Start by rinsing your bikini with cool water. If you can, let them soak in a sink for 15-20 minutes. Or if there’s a shower available, you can hop in—that’ll get rid of any chemicals or sweat that’s on the fabric. Just make sure that the water isn’t too hot.

Next, create a bath. Turn on the tap and fill a sink with tepid water. Add in half a scoop of ACTIVE detergent and mix until the powder is dissolved. You may have to agitate the water with your hand a bit.

Tip: You can handwash more than one bikini at a time. You’ll just have to pour in a bit more detergent.

Turn the bikini inside out—both the top and bottom—and place it in the soapy water. The item should be completely covered by the solution. Gently swish it through the liquid to loosen any dirt and let it soak for about half an hour.

Replace the dirty water with fresh water from the tap and use it to rinse the bikini. Continue until all of the detergent is gone (when there are no more soap suds). You can also rinse the suit by holding it under the faucet. Either way, you want to make sure that there’s no soap film left on the item.

Squeeze the excess water out of the bikini. Don’t twist it like a dishrag; that will stretch out the fibers permanently. Roll it up inside a towel instead, if it’s still excessively wet. From there, lay it flat to dry away from sunlight. Avoid the dryer at all costs—it’s not something that you want to use for swimsuits.

The Right Way to Machine Wash Blackbough Bikinis

Rinse the bikini with cool water before putting it in the washing machine. If you can, soak it in the sink—that’s even better. The goal is to get rid of any chemicals or body oils that are on the fabric.

Tun the bikini—both the top and bottom pieces—inside out and place them in a laundry bag. The bag will act as a physical barrier so that your suit will be protected against the agitation of the machine. Also, it’ll keep them together and prevent them from snagging on other items (you can wash bikinis with other activewear as long as you keep them separated with garment bags).

Make sure that the bag is properly zipped and place it in the washer. Add a couple of towels to balance the load if you’re just washing your bikinis. If you’re washing a mixed load, add the rest of your clothes.

Pour in one scoop of ACTIVE detergent (more if you’re washing a lot of items). Skip the softener and bleach.

Tip: White vinegar is a suitable alternative to fabric softener. Not only is it all-natural, but it’ll also leave no residue. Simply add one cup to the final rinse cycle.

Choose a delicate wash setting (the machine equivalent to handwashing) and run a cold water cycle. Avoid hot water; the heat will damage the delicate fibers. Wait until the cycle is finished before taking out your bikini. Lay it flat to dry on a clean towel. You can also use a laundry rack. Don’t tumble dry.

Washing Blackbough Swim Sarongs

The brand offers a variety of sarongs that you can handwash or machine wash. We’ll be explaining how below.

Putting Your Blackbough Swim Sarongs In the Washer

Unfold the sarong and place it in a mesh laundry bag. It’ll protect it against your other clothes (assuming that you’re washing a mixed load) and prevent it from being thrown around during the wash cycle.

Close the bag and put it in the washer. Add the rest of your clothes (you can wash your sarongs with other items as long as you sort the colors). Measure and pour one scoop of ACTIVE detergent into the dispenser/drum. Don’t use bleach; it’ll cause the colors to fade. Similarly, you want to avoid fabric softener—it’ll coat your sarong with a waxy residue.

Tip: You can remove stains from your sarong with a bit of dish soap. Start by wetting the area. Next, add the soap. Gently scrub the stain with a soft-bristled toothbrush and rinse with cold water. From there, you can wash the item as normal.

Run a gentle wash cycle with cold water. Don’t use hot water; it can damage the delicate fabric.

Take your sarong out of the washing machine once the cycle is finished and let it air dry. We recommend draping it across a drying rack or hanging it up on a clothesline (away from direct sunlight). Avoid drying it with the dryer.

Hand Washing Your Sarong In the Sink

Turn on the tap and fill a sink (or washtub) with tepid water. Add 1/2 a scoop of ACTIVE detergent to create a bath. You can help the powder dissolve by agitating the water with your hand.

Unfold your sarong and place it in the sink. Gently swish it through the solution a few times to loosen any dirt. Remember, it should be completely submerged. Let it soak for up to 20-30 minutes.

Rinse the sarong thoroughly with cool water—you want to remove all of the detergent. You can either hold it under the faucet or rinse it in the sink (you’ll have to refill it with fresh water). Either way, you want to continue until all of the soap is gone.

Gently squeeze the water out of the sarong with your hands and place it on a clean towel. Put another towel on top and press down to remove any excess moisture. Don’t wring or twist the garment like a regular towel as that’ll ruin the fibers. Also, you don’t want to put it in the dryer. Let it air dry instead, ideally on a laundry rack or clothesline.

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