Marysia Washing Instructions

Marysia is a luxury swimwear brand that’s known for their bikinis and resort wear. They also sell accessories such as bags, hats, towels, and jewelry.

More About Marysia

Marysia was founded by Marisa Dobrzanska Reeves in 2009. A former ballerina, she had decided to create her own brand after noticing a void in the marketplace for a fashion-driven swimwear boutique. Fast forward to today and it’s become a cult favorite among bloggers and celebrities across the globe.

Aside from their online shop, you can find their products at Saks Fifth Avenue, Everything But Water, Perch, The Webster, and several other retailers.

What Kind of Swimwear Do They Sell?

Marysia offers various bikini sets, one pieces, all of which are made from sustainable fabrics. They also have a reversible collection that can be worn in more than one way.

Price-wise, you’re looking at around $150 to $200 for a bathing suit. Obviously, it depends on the style. Some will be cheaper while others will be more expensive. It’s worth noting, however, that they do have a sale section on their site, where you can find some discounted products.

Taking Care of Marysia Swimwear

Their bikinis and one pieces are made to last, however, they can still wear out, especially if you’re not careful. For one thing, you never want to expose them to heat (e.g. dryer, hot tubs). Also, you want to be careful how you wash them; the delicate fibers can easily get damaged and that can ruin the item. 

Need some help? Want to know how to wash their swimsuits? If so, you’re at the right place—we’ll be going over the instructions in detail below, so be sure to keep reading!

What Are Their Bathing Suits Made Of?

All of their swimsuits—both one pieces and bikinis—are made from technical fibers. Nylon and spandex, to be exact. Here’s what you need to know about these materials.

Nylon

Nylon is water repellent, which makes it suitable for swimwear. Not only that, but it’s durable, strong, and has excellent elasticity. However, it’s rarely used by itself; it’s often blended with other technical fibers such as spandex or elastane (this gives it more flexibility).

Spandex

Spandex goes by a couple of other names including Lycra and elastane. Similar to nylon, it has great elasticity and can stretch many times its length before snapping back to its original form. You’ll often see it blended with nylon, polyester, and other fibers.

Polyester

Polyester is resistant to wrinkles, chemicals, moisture, and abrasion. It’s also quick-drying, which comes in handy when you have to wash your swimsuit. Like most man-made fibers, however, it doesn’t do well with heat. For one thing, the material can distort or melt. That’s why it should always be washed with cold water.

How to Wash Marysia Swimsuits So That They’ll Last

The company recommends that you handwash their swimsuits with cold water. However, you can also throw them in the washer if you’re in a time crunch; there are just a few precautions that you have to take. We’ll be going over both methods below.

Hand Washing Your Marysia Bikinis and One-Pieces 

Rinse your bathing suit with cold water as soon as you take it off. That’ll prevent chemicals and body oils from sticking to the fabric, which will help preserve the colors. If you can, give it a soak in the sink—that’s even more effective.

While it’s soaking, prepare a bath. Fill a washbasin or sink with cool water and pour in half a scoop of ACTIVE detergent powder. Wait for it to dissolve completely. You can speed up the process by giving the water a few swishes with your hand.

Tip: Accidently got some sunscreen on your bikini? You can remove the stain with a bit of baking soda. Add it to the spot, rub it in, and let it soak before rinsing with water. You can then wash it as normal.

Once you’ve soaked your suit, turn it inside out and place it in the soapy solution. Press down on the fabric so that the item is completely immersed in the water. Let it sit in the detergent for up to half an hour.

Rinse the garment thoroughly once the time is up. There are two ways that you can go about doing this—you can either rinse it under the faucet (ie. hold it under running water) or in the sink (you’ll have to drain and refill it with clean water). It doesn’t matter which method you choose as long as you rinse off all the soap suds. There shouldn’t be any soap film left when you’re done rinsing.

Squeeze the bathing suit softly to remove the excess water. You can also roll it up in a towel, if necessary. From there, lay it on a flat surface and allow it to dry. Don’t use the dryer. Also, don’t use a hanger; the water weight can cause the fabric to stretch out permanently.

Throwing Your Marysia Bikinis and One-Pieces Into the Washer

Don’t throw your suit directly into the washing machine. Use a laundry bag; it’ll keep the pieces together and prevent them from being thrown around and snagging on other items. Also, it’s important that you turn it inside out. That way, the outer layer will be protected from the agitation of the machine. The colors won’t fade, and your swimsuit will last longer.

Zip up the laundry bag and pop it in the washer. We recommend adding a few towels, ideally one on each side, to help maintain a balanced load. Or if you’re washing a mixed load, you can add the rest of your clothes (you can wash bikinis and one-pieces with other delicate items such as bras and lingerie as long as you’ve separated them based on color).

Add one scoop of ACTIVE detergent (you can adjust the amount based on your load size). Don’t use any bleach or fabric conditioner; the former will cause the fabric to fade while the latter will cover it with a waxy substance.

Next, choose your settings. For swimsuits and delicates in general, you want to run a gentle cycle with cold water. Hot water can stretch or warp the nylon fabric.

Wait for the washing machine to finish running before taking your bikini/one-piece out. Transfer it to a clean surface and let it air dry. Once again, don’t use the dryer, and don’t hang it up on a clothesline. Let it dry naturally indoors, away from the sun (UV rays can bleach the fabric).

Washing Guide For Marysia Resort Wear

Marysia also sells resort wear, which is made from the same sustainable fabric as their swimsuits. Given that, it’s not surprising to know that they can be washed in a similar fashion.

Machine Washing Marysia Resort Wear

Turn the garment inside out before putting it inside the washer. That’ll prevent the outer layer from fading or pilling. And if you can, use a garment bag—that’ll add an extra layer of protection so that it won’t get caught on your other items (for those who are washing a mixed load).

Zip up the bag, make sure that it’s completely closed, and put it in the machine. Put in the rest of your clothes and add your detergent. One scoop of ACTIVE detergent will do unless you’re washing an extra large load, in which case, you may need to add more powder. Don’t use fabric softener or bleach; they’ll do more harm than good to your clothes.

Tip: You can soften your resort wear with white vinegar. Just add one cup to the rinse cycle (don’t worry, it won’t leave a vinegary smell).

Choose a gentle cycle with minimum spin and let it run. Remember to use cold water—hot water can damage certain fabrics.

Take your resort wear out of the machine as soon as the cycle is finished and let it air dry on a hanger or drying rack. Depending on the item, you may be able to dry it with the dryer. When in doubt, check the care tag label. It’ll tell you whether or not the garment can be tumble-dried.

Washing Your Marysia Resort Wear By Hand

Turn your resort wear inside out and set aside. Fill a large sink with cool water and pour in half a scoop of ACTIVE detergent. Dissolve the powder by swishing the water with your hand. Place the garment in the sink once it’s fully dissolved and press down so that it’s completely immersed in the solution.

Let it sit for about 30 minutes. Don’t leave it in the sink too long, otherwise, the colors can bleed.

Wash off the detergent by rinsing the item with cold water. We recommend holding it under the faucet. Continue until the water runs clear (it can take a couple of minutes, depending on the amount of soap suds that are on the fabric). Or if you want, you can rinse it in the sink. For that, you’ll have to drain the dirty water and refill it from the tap.

Give the item a soft squeeze to get rid of the excess water. Don’t use twisting motions—that can damage the material. Once the water is out, you can hang it up to dry, or if the care label permits, you can put it in the dryer.

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